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Bojana Ginn bio | statement | press

Review: “Phygital Muse” at Whitespec deals deals in difficult but timely subject
December 15, 2016
ArtsAtl.com
By Rebecca Brantley

“Phygital Muse,” Bojana Ginn’s exhibition at Whitespec through December 31, deals in difficult but timely subject matter — the union of physical and digital realms. Ginn studied medicine before turning to art, and her work is driven by transhumanism — too simply described here as the discourse of how the human body is affected by technological advances. In her statement, Ginn positions herself outside the ethics of the field. Read more.

Review: Five artists present visually engaging surprises in “Praxis” at Agnes Scott’s Dalton Gallery
October 29, 2015
ArtsAtl.com
By Jerry Cullum

Praxis, at Agnes Scott College’s Dalton Gallery through November 13, is an extraordinary exhibition with a somewhat baffling premise.

Making reference to Aristotle’s theories, Jeffrey Whittle, exhibition curator and gallery director, explains that the show’s five artists represent artistic praxis (practice) in a variety of media and meditational or spiritual practice. Read more.

Bojana Ginn: Recoding the Digital, at Swan Coach House Gallery
October 29, 2014
Burnaway.org
By Eric Hancock

Bojana Ginn‘s exhibition “Recode. Play. Loop.,” on view at Swan Coach House Gallery through this Friday, comes at the digital genre with similar pretension, but with an honesty that reinforces its strength. The Yugoslavian-born artist, a trained medical professional, borrows from the language that informed her former vocation. Read more.

Review: Science meets play in Bojana Ginn’s “Liquid Lines” at Further Art
August 1, 2013
ArtsAtl.com
By Dinah McClintock

When one of my students writes “Monet played with color” or “Rembrandt played with light,” my impulse is to correct them, insisting that artists’ deployment of formal elements and manipulation of their medium are more deliberate and thought-based than mere “play.” But Bojana Ginn’s “Liquid Lines,” at Further Art through August 20, demonstrates that “play” can be a mechanism to reveal the unexpected potential of medium and image. Read more.